Archive for ‘Homelessness’

March 15, 2011

William E. Sadowski Affordable Housing Trust Fund

I’m pretty sure that with the concern that is going on in Broward County in all with the acceptance of the parochial school advancement and all that a bit of information on another aspect of religious subjecting would be about the homeless situation that has transpired for some time now in what most could consider a metro Broward County. In 1992 Visionary Fla. Lawmakers enacted a landmark affordable housing law that earmarked revenues raised from the documentary stamp tax on real estate transactions to affordable housing.

“Gov. Bush initially opposed reauthorizing the funds. He claimed that recent dramatic increases in home prices and the resulting increase in property tax revenue funneled too much money into the affordable housing trust funds, and he believed more of it should be spent on other worthy state programs. SB 2514, A separate bill that the governor favored, would have limited the total amount of money in the trust funds to their 2003 levels; but that failed to pass the Florida Legislature, making it unclear whether Gov. Bush would sign the reauthorization bills without his requested spending limit guarantee. Lawmakers continued the tradition of providing for affordable housing for Florida families by passing legislation to reauthorize the state’s two housing trust funds. This includes the William E. Sadowski Affordable Housing Trust Fund in which this program has helped more than 130,000 families buy a home. (Florida Association of Realtors)

HB 1375, this session’s ‘comprehensive’ affordable housing bill included $15 million for extremely low income housing development. This is a 50 percent decrease from the current funding set a-side.

Florida lawmakers refused to remove the cap on the Sadowski Trust Fund. The House did workshop a bill to remove the cap in its Policy and Budget Council; however that is where it ended. The Senate did not address the cap in any committee. (No bill heard in committees). The Legislature did appropriate $391,400,000 of the Sadowski fund towards Housing initiatives some of the money appropriated was from last year’s unappropriated dollars.

ENROLLED 2004 Legislature SB 1000;

An act relating to trust funds; re-creating:

Local Government Housing Trust Fund within the Department of Community Affairs without modification; carrying forward current balances and continuing current sources and uses thereof; providing an effective date.

WHEREAS, the Legislature wishes to extend the life of the Local Government Housing Trust Fund within the Department of Community Affairs, which is otherwise scheduled to be terminated pursuant to constitutional mandate, and WHEREAS, the Legislature has reviewed the trust fund before its scheduled termination date and has found that it continues to meet an important public purpose, an WHEREAS, the Legislature has found that existing public policy concerning the trust fund sets adequate parameters for its use, NOW, THEREFORE, Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida. Evidence that there [(a state acted involvement concern)] was a suspected consideration to take an effective approach to what seemed to be a prospecting public funded program. This act shall take effect November 4, 2004.

ENROLLED 2004 Legislature SB 1002:

An act relating to trust funds; re-creating the State Housing Trust Fund within the Department of Community Affairs without modification; carrying forward current balances and continuing current sources and uses thereof; providing an effective date.

WHEREAS, the Legislature wishes to extend the life of the State Housing Trust Fund within the Department of Community Affairs, which is otherwise scheduled to be terminated pursuant to constitutional mandate, and WHEREAS, the Legislature has reviewed the trust fund before its scheduled termination date and has found that it continues to meet an important public purpose, and WHEREAS, the Legislature has found that existing public policy concerning the trust fund sets adequate parameters for its use, NOW, THEREFORE,

Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

This act shall take effect November 4, 2004.

“The next step is for the subcommittee to mark up a THUD bill that divvies up the $50.7 billion in allocated subcommittee funding among all of the federal programs under its jurisdiction, including funding for all HUD programs. The THUD subcommittee, chaired by Representative John Olver (D-MA), will hold its mark-up for the FY08 spending bill…” and this was back in June so what has come of the approach that has been taken by those of concern? (http://www.flshc.net/documents/FLSHCworkgroup.pdf)

“Right now, we’re on the defensive,” she says. “We’re not even asking for increased funding. We just want lawmakers to get rid of the cap.”

Jaimie Ross, [left,] affordable housing director for 1,000 Friends of Florida, a Tallahassee-based watchdog group, says unless the cap is repealed, affordable housing programs will lose up to $1 billion in unallocated funds.

It’s now 2007 and no word has come of this program as of yet! Is there still any-one out there that has anything to do with the concern of what is at hand? We must feel proud that we can over look the fact that this program has been hailed and yet there is no economic response of any more success or even improvement coming from this network of private peoples that have expressed their own personal consideration for the homeless as a mass. I’m taken the approach that the big fuss is supposed to be about the HUD McKinney-Vento act that is also being put but for more money considerations, how bout that!

When it comes to me, consider the state as it sees the views and opinions of those involved with this act as a trust fund also.

As it was responded to me from you Representative Mica, you were or are a co-founder of the HUD Vento-McKinney Act that as a response to the lack of housing situation that are allotted to the homeless made sure that there can continue to be an option of available funds to allow such a consideration. However with some research there has brought another fund that seems to be state drive but more of a private funded act in the Sadowski Trust fund. For some time back in 2004 and 2005 there seemed to be a lack in approval taken in by the state that made this fund become to a state of remorse and lacking the funding that it needed to maintain a dependable resolve for those that are out on the street. As a matter of concern, what made this a fund that does not receive such attention as the Vento-McKinney Act? Is it that there is a difference in the fact that one is a national matter as opposed to the Sadowski fund which is mainly a local effort keeping all the attention focused on the Metro Broward area?

As the Vento-McKinney Act receives that attention that it needs to becoming restructured questions about other funds and acts that are structured in the same manner as such will become more and more attentive and demanding the same attention, will this happen and under what means?

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March 15, 2011

Housing and Recovery Act of 2008‏

As the Act is placed into order, we are brought to the attention that as this nation faces financial crisis we as working Americans are not only placed into tax brackets but income categories as well with the implication of aid to being taken into effect as the differences of income earning are sighted.

The income categories are to be based on yearly earning averages of the American worker.

Extremely Low Income $7,644 or under yearly earning
Very Low Income 18,345 yearly earning
Low Income 29,557 yearly earning
Moderate Income $44,844 yearly earning
Above Moderate Income $76,439 yearly earning

As the effects of the bill are introduced, many stipulations are expected to take place and be considered for three of the five classes due to the fact that these people are struggling and the health of the economy are made notice. The three classes are extremely low income, very low income, and low income.

As the bill is read a new provision is made notice and is expected to being taken into affect due to the voice that the American public has made in light of the foreclosure crisis as well as the recent affects of the numerous weather disasters take on by this nation. Not only has the home-owner portion of the housing market by devastated, however the rental market has witnessed drastic losses if the consideration of a hurricane named Katrina and the state of Louisiana may be used to express a further concern into the rental market of this nation. The revised Housing and Economic Act as expressed for the fiscal year of 2008 is expressed the rental housing market and the owners aspect of the housing market are to be placed into the bill as necessary measures as the bill also extends the national deficit from nine point eight two trillion to reach a limit of ten point six two trillion American dollars,(Sec. 3083).

Section 1131 of the 2008 Housing and Economic Recovery Act is to: Establish a Housing Trust Fund to be used to increase and preserve the supply of rental housing for extremely low and very low-income families.

Off record, an opinion is stated that each state that has been affected by some sort of weather phenomenon has focused financial expectations to being made to the rental market that this nation carries when an economic reasoning is addressed. Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Kansas, Louisiana all are those states in which hurricanes or tornadoes have brought tremendous debt to the housing and rental market as federal aid is addressed and considered to aid the healing process of the state. Each have been placed as national emergency states in which ‘bonus depreciated’ states of economic concern may and will be considered as federal aid is expressed.

As the rental market is now being brought to the light of government flexibility as a trust fund is to aid and preserve rental housing as a marketable assumption will this become the workings of a ‘work-out’ rather than a ‘bail-out’ of this financial situation that we as a civilized society will come to terms with as finance of the nation is concerned ?

March 10, 2011

Samaritan Housing program

The $50 million Samaritan Housing program is a new program effort not requested in previous years. HUD’s Samaritan program will be used in conjunction with other Federal resources, particularly those from HHS and VA, aimed at ending chronic homelessness. Currently, there exist resources spread among many Departments and agencies, which, in general, assist homeless people, including those who experience chronic homelessness. However, the Samaritan Housing program will provide targeted resources to assist this visible population of homeless people. These resources will be focused strategically to secure the desired performance outcomes. (Comments from the website of Housing and Urban Development Agency; HUD)

Authorizing legislation will be submitted to amend the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 1987, as amended.

As information has been received as to the presentation of this program as an incentive towards ending chronic homelessness some questions have arrived as to how to make this an acting program to become benefactors as citizens of the state of Florida? The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act has been re-introduced to the 110th congressional proceedings to becoming an active bill as well as seeking sponsors that may allow this nation to become a witness of a working legislation proceeding as well as benefactors of a program that will promote a positive working and socially functioning environment for all people of this nation.

The Samaritan Housing program builds on the joint Departments of Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services (HHS), and Veteran Affairs (VA) effort, announced in July 2002, and developed under the aegis of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness. The Council is comprised of 18 Federal departments and agencies. A jointly issued NOFA will seek to identify model programs throughout the country that have been successful in reducing the number of homeless people living on the street.

Seeing as to how this program is based solely on a federal level, it may pose a threat to the local organizations that have already committed to making homelessness an issue that is only heard about from other cities. So how is this to be introduced as a working means of funds to also promote the positive influence of making the streets free of homelessness? The program’s scope will be to communities throughout the country who are prepared to partner with the Federal government to produce visible, measurable, and quantifiable performance outcomes that reduce the number of people living on the streets and in encampments.

As the scope of the program is considered then the possibility of conducting a means of communication as a response to this possible funding action seems to be the only way to announce and implicate the public efforts of a community and the local agencies handling the issue of homelessness to become aware of.

The fiscal year 2005 Budget proposes $50 million for the Samaritan Housing program to focus on those experiencing chronic homelessness on the streets across the country. The program’s resources will provide housing options and appropriate aggressive outreach and services to homeless people residing outside the reach of current programs. This initiative supports the Strategic Objective to end chronic homelessness. The effort is also crucial to reducing overall homelessness because persons who are chronically homeless often require resources beyond their proportion of the overall homeless population. Effective programs to meet the needs of this difficult population will free up resources for the overall homeless reduction effort. This initiative will provide effective models that can be used more broadly.

This specific effort requires additional resources to support the strategic means to fulfill the President’s and Secretary’s commitment to end chronic homelessness by 2012. The requested budget amount will represent HUD’s segment of a larger total amount of resources in a broader Samaritan Initiative to end chronic homelessness in a decade reflecting the continuation of the jointly administered effort begun in 2002. The Samaritan Housing program will focus on targeting those people experiencing chronic homelessness with an outcome oriented, field tested outreach strategy that will appropriately move this street population into supportive housing settings that combine housing and social services to support and sustain the resultant tenancies.

This initiative’s scope will be to communities throughout the country who are prepared to partner with the Federal government to produce visible, measurable, and quantifiable performance outcomes that reduce the number of people living on the streets.

The Samaritan Housing program continues and builds on the joint HUD, HHS and VA effort, announced in July 2002, and developed under the aegis of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (comprised of 20 Federal departments and agencies). A joint Notice of Fund Availability (NOFA) was issued in January 2003. It focused on initiating the President’s and Secretary’s commitment to end chronic homelessness, and to identify model programs throughout the country that will successfully reduce the number of homeless people living on the streets. Awards were made to 11 grantees. The United States Interagency Council on Homelessness will continue to provide leadership for jointly administered efforts to assist the chronically homeless population, including specifically, the Samaritan Housing program as part of the broader Samaritan Initiative to end chronic homelessness.

As a question coming from the reading of this program(Samaritan Housing program), how is one considered as a benefactor of this program if one is a chronic homeless person? The Samaritan Housing Initiative will be fully implemented and the number of chronically homeless who are assisted will be maximized. The Administration will submit legislation for the Samaritan initiative, a new competitive grant program that supports the administration’s efforts to end chronic homelessness by [2002] 2012. Funding of $50 million for housing grants is requested in 2005 to support the most promising local strategies to move chronically homeless persons from the streets to safe permanent housing with supportive services. Supportive Services will be funded through [HHS and VA funded by] the Departments of [Housing and Urban Development (HUD)], Health and Human Services (HHS), and Veterans Affairs (VA).(U.S.Department of Housing and Development)

March 9, 2011

The Lake Wales Policy of Housing‏

Title XII
MUNICIPALITIES Chapter 166
MUNICIPALITIES

1166.041 Procedures for adoption of ordinances and resolutions

2(c) Ordinances initiated by other than the municipality that change the actual zoning map designation of a parcel or parcels of land shall be enacted pursuant to paragraph.

Chapter 67 “Affordable Housing”
Orlando City Ordinance that needs to be seen as the potential that it is when the consideration of the low-income and homeless are considered. It seems that federal money can be placed into a trust fund appointed to the direction of allowing housing for those that are not able to afford a house or apartment on there own influence of income.

I’m resolving that if not the city of Lake Wales then Polk County should come to the attention of this consideration. There are to many options out there that have a federal influence that will allow money to be brought into the city for this purpose when the housing consideration is expected for those that have not the means of making it on their own.

The following is just the Title and the different sections of the City of Orlando’s Affordable Housing ordinance that allows the low-income to become home owners or residents that have not to worry about the income consideration of being housed while living in the city of Orlando.

Chapter 67 AFFORDABLE HOUSING

__________
*Editor’s note: Ord. of 2-22-1993, Doc. #26393, amended the Code by adopting a new ch. 67, “Affordable Housing.”

__________
Part 1. Introduction
Sec. 67.100. Relationship to the Growth Management Plan.
Sec. 67.101. Purpose of Affordable Housing Chapter.
Sec. 67.102. When this Chapter Applies.
Sec. 67.103. Definitions.
Secs. 67.104–67.199. Reserved.
Part 2. Local Housing Assistance Trust Fund
Sec. 67.200. Establishment of Local Housing Assistance Trust Fund.
Sec. 67.201. Investment of Trust Fund Assets.
Sec. 67.202. Expenditures from the Fund.
Sec. 67.203. Fund Accounting.
Secs. 67.204–67.299. Reserved.
Part 3. Local Housing Assistance Program
Sec. 67.300. Establishment of the City of Orlando Housing Assistance Program.
Sec. 67.301. Purpose.
Sec. 67.302. Use of Local Housing Assistance Trust Fund.
Sec. 67.303. Implementation of Local Housing Assistance Program.
Sec. 67.304. Administrative Responsibilities and Costs.
Secs. 67.305–67.399. Reserved.
Part 4. Affordable Housing Advisory Committee
Sec. 67.400. Establishment of Affordable Housing Advisory Committee.
Sec. 67.401. Committee Membership and Officers.
Sec. 67.402. Committee Procedures.
Sec. 67.403. General Functions, Powers and Duties.
Sec. 67.404. Committee Reports.
Sec. 67.405. Affordable Housing Incentive Plan.
Secs. 67.406–67.499. Reserved.
Part 5. Annual Status Report to The State of Florida
Sec. 67.500. Annual Status Report.
Sec. 67.501. Public Availability of Report.
Secs. 67.502–67.599. Reserved.
Part 6. Alternative Development Standards for Low and Very Low Income Housing Projects
Sec. 67.600. Purpose of Alternative Development Standards for Low and Very Low Income Housing.
Sec. 67.601. Prerequisites to Utilization of Alternative Housing Development Standards.
Sec. 67.602. Procedural Requirements.
Sec. 67.603. Specific Residential Developments.
Sec. 67.604. Development Site Standards and Principal Building Setbacks.
Sec. 67.605. Landscaping.
Sec. 67.606. Alternative Housing Transportation Standards.
Sec. 67.607. Performance Standards for Low and Very Low Income Housing.
Sec. 67.608. Residential District Standards.

As viewed, there are all the aspects that will allow the maintainable and dependency of this program to remain operable and a stability structured program for the purpose of allowing those that may not be able to afford housing on their own income or even-so just helping to keep what they have.

The following is a bill just passed by congress (as a national effort) to help the maintainance of programs like this for cities that have the local authority to allow affordable housing to be kept as an effort to allow those that are having trouble with low-income to maintain affordable management of housing.

Representative Barney Frank (D-MA), chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, introduced the National Affordable Housing Trust Fund Act of 2007 (H.R. 2895). The bill establishes a National Housing Trust Fund reserving funds for the production, rehabilitation and preservation of 1.5 million affordable housing units for low and very-low income people, stipulating that at least 75% of funds provided go to extremely low-income households (earning below 30% of median income).

The bill, introduced with strong bipartisan support, was released with Representative Maxine Waters (D-CA), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Opportunity and Jim Ramstad (R-MN), and other members of Congress. The National Affordable Housing Trust Fund will be financed by the proposed legislation H.R. 1427, the GSE Affordable Housing Fund, savings from the Federal Housing Administration resulting from the enactment of H.R. 1852, the Expanding American Homeownership Act, and any additional sources of funding to be designated to the Trust Fund.

The only way to get federal money towards the support of housing those in need as well as the maintainance is to make a law excepting this sort of support of state and federal programs when monetary status is a concern.Title XII
MUNICIPALITIES Chapter 166
MUNICIPALITIES

1166.041 Procedures for adoption of ordinances and resolutions

2(c) Ordinances initiated by other than the municipality that change the actual zoning map designation of a parcel or parcels of land shall be enacted pursuant to paragraph.

Chapter 67 “Affordable Housing”
Orlando City Ordinance that needs to be seen as the potential that it is when the consideration of the low-income and homeless are considered. It seems that federal money can be placed into a trust fund appointed to the direction of allowing housing for those that are not able to afford a house or apartment on there own influence of income.

I’m resolving that if not the city of Lake Wales then Polk County should come to the attention of this consideration. There are to many options oout there that have a federal influence that will allow money to be brought into the city for this purpose whne the houding consideration is expected for those that have not the means of making it on their own.

The following is just the Title and the different sections of the City of Orlando’s Affordable Housing ordinance that allows the low-income to become home owners or residents that have not to worry about the income consideration of being housed while living in the city of Orlando.

Chapter 67 AFFORDABLE HOUSING

__________
*Editor’s note: Ord. of 2-22-1993, Doc. #26393, amended the Code by adopting a new ch. 67, “Affordable Housing.”

__________
Part 1. Introduction
Sec. 67.100. Relationship to the Growth Management Plan.
Sec. 67.101. Purpose of Affordable Housing Chapter.
Sec. 67.102. When this Chapter Applies.
Sec. 67.103. Definitions.
Secs. 67.104–67.199. Reserved.
Part 2. Local Housing Assistance Trust Fund
Sec. 67.200. Establishment of Local Housing Assistance Trust Fund.
Sec. 67.201. Investment of Trust Fund Assets.
Sec. 67.202. Expenditures from the Fund.
Sec. 67.203. Fund Accounting.
Secs. 67.204–67.299. Reserved.
Part 3. Local Housing Assistance Program
Sec. 67.300. Establishment of the City of Orlando Housing Assistance Program.
Sec. 67.301. Purpose.
Sec. 67.302. Use of Local Housing Assistance Trust Fund.
Sec. 67.303. Implementation of Local Housing Assistance Program.
Sec. 67.304. Administrative Responsibilities and Costs.
Secs. 67.305–67.399. Reserved.
Part 4. Affordable Housing Advisory Committee
Sec. 67.400. Establishment of Affordable Housing Advisory Committee.
Sec. 67.401. Committee Membership and Officers.
Sec. 67.402. Committee Procedures.
Sec. 67.403. General Functions, Powers and Duties.
Sec. 67.404. Committee Reports.
Sec. 67.405. Affordable Housing Incentive Plan.
Secs. 67.406–67.499. Reserved.
Part 5. Annual Status Report to The State of Florida
Sec. 67.500. Annual Status Report.
Sec. 67.501. Public Availability of Report.
Secs. 67.502–67.599. Reserved.
Part 6. Alternative Development Standards for Low and Very Low Income Housing Projects
Sec. 67.600. Purpose of Alternative Development Standards for Low and Very Low Income Housing.
Sec. 67.601. Prerequisites to Utilization of Alternative Housing Development Standards.
Sec. 67.602. Procedural Requirements.
Sec. 67.603. Specific Residential Developments.
Sec. 67.604. Development Site Standards and Principal Building Setbacks.
Sec. 67.605. Landscaping.
Sec. 67.606. Alternative Housing Transportation Standards.
Sec. 67.607. Performance Standards for Low and Very Low Income Housing.
Sec. 67.608. Residential District Standards.

As viewed, there are all the aspcets that will allow the maintainance and dependancy of this program to remain operable and a stabily structured program for the purpose of allowing those that may not be able to afford housing on their own income or even-so just helping to keep what they have.

The following is a bill just passed by congress (as a national effort) to help the maintainance of programs like this for cities that have the local authority to allow affordable housing to be kept as an effort to allow those that are having trouble with low-income to maintain affordable management of housing.

Representative Barney Frank (D-MA), chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, introduced the National Affordable Housing Trust Fund Act of 2007 (H.R. 2895). The bill establishes a National Housing Trust Fund reserving funds for the production, rehabilitation and preservation of 1.5 million affordable housing units for low and very-low income people, stipulating that at least 75% of funds provided go to extremely low-income households (earning below 30% of median income).

The bill, introduced with strong bipartisan support, was released with Representative Maxine Waters (D-CA), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Opportunity and Jim Ramstad (R-MN), and other members of Congress. The National Affordable Housing Trust Fund will be financed by the proposed legislation H.R. 1427, the GSE Affordable Housing Fund, savings from the Federal Housing Administration resulting from the enactment of H.R. 1852, the Expanding American Homeownership Act, and any additional sources of funding to be designated to the Trust Fund.

The only way to get federal money towards the support of housing those in need as well as the maintainance is to make a law excepting this sort of support of state and federal programs when monetary status is a concern.

March 9, 2011

What is homelesness?

As this week begins and I only have one day to work I’d like to reflect on the issue that has become to being known as homelessness.

What is homelessness actually?

Is It a condition that one just so happens to have a case of? Is it the situation that brings a person to stating that they have no home at all? What ever it is it seems to bring the people of this nation to unmeasurable extremes, unsound causes, as well as putting a considerable amount of wear and tear on one body. Me, not having any time available to work at my current employment has helped me to bring this concern forth to your attention.

Does not having the potential to work and earn money make people homeless? Cause as I’ve been working at this current job (a temp position) that is a very large concern among the fellow workers that I come into contact with. Hours of work time is a very large concern that people that I have come into contact with express as a very large concern as the option of work and the given possibilities of work are expressed by employers and taken in by the employees. But, does this mean that they are on the verge of being homeless as we continue to come together as a team to take on the tasks related to work when we are called to work? To be honest I thought that days off were praised and seen as being almost heaven like when brought to the attention of those working.

Is homelessness a disease that one comes down with when their luck has run out? Is it really a situation that one faces when all else fails and the determination of survival is set into place? Is it really as bad as it seems to be where it seems that the situation known as homelessness is expressed by those in this position are viewed as being? Is it really a person with nothing else but the streets and the atmosphere that is given thereof?

How has this nation of America and the society that makes up this nation come to terms with this incident that has been named Homelessness and the actual living concerns thereof?

I guess the real question is this: how important is work to a person that may come to considering this potential of threats, cause I thought homelessness is the condition of not having a proper shelter to dwell in; however, it seems that due to certain situations this issue has also brought the concern of work to the table as well?

As broad as the spectrum is this is expressed as homelessness considerations are placed with a large amount of potential as to the actual reasoning as to the why’s and how’s of this very important issue as it is seen and viewed being homelessness.

March 9, 2011

Florida showing rural homeless concerns as a state

For some time now I’ve been working in conclusion with the National Coalition for the Homeless in the regards to ending (for the most part) rural homelessness as to the fact that not much is currently known as to the how’s and why’s that may be asked when considering this condition of impoverished living standards know to take place in this nation of free individuals as a society.

Being a Polk County resident (Florida) I’ve taken into consideration the effects of living costs through-out each city as well as the consideration of wage earnings that may be assumed when speaking of employment through-out this agricultural county when the basis of skilled and unskilled employment is addressed and attentioned in regards to homeless considerations.

One component that is known about homelessness is that a stereotype is placed on homelessness as being a burden in which largely populated areas are concluded to having and showing affects in which this consideration as a opinion is not true. There are aspects of rural life in which homeless consideration and effects to negate this burden should be addressed and taken into serious matters such as advocacy procedures and attention.

Bringing forth the fact in which not much is known about rural homelessness I’ve identified the potentials of work ethics, work quality, wage earnings, employment considerations, living costs, living standards, and the actual consideration of bringing attention to the awareness drawn from the state of being homeless under rural conditions.

As this letter is written and read, I (Aaron Shaw) wish to become inclined with any and all information that may help to bring an end to this undisireable condition of living as it is expressed as a matter of concern and has a level of reasoning that is to bring this subject as a matter of attentioning.

March 9, 2011

Florida first in homeless attacks!‏

I’ve been looking at the news here at a hotel due to the fact that my aunts house burnt down and what is the main head line that makes the news on the bright house channel 13 correspondence? The fact that the state of Florida is number one in attacks on the homeless with 30 attacks last year and three of those being fatal attacks. All over my Facebook page I’ve been keeping up with events that have to do with the homeless as to keep any room for potential open as an effort of progress is meant to be made as the economic struggles of this nation continue to make it harder and harder for those that are homeless to have the ability to get of the streets and stay off the streets.

I thank you for taking notice of the fact that I had called, wondering what is going on with the rural aspect of homelessness as the county of Polk here in Florida is becoming a newly infested breeding ground for the low-incomed and I feel that if some thing is not done to bring for that an awareness of the fact that this particular area of Florida needs to be brought up to par with the changes in standards of living assumptions and considerations of different aspects of assistance to keep this from becoming a targeted area such as Miami/Dade.

March 9, 2011

Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program

The Second Chance Act, passed by Congress and signed by the President in early 2008, has been explicitly billed as a “first step” in developing a more effective federal response to the problem of people leaving corrections without adequate support. This act reauthorizes and revises an existing grant program within the Department of Justice, providing money to states for reentry programs, and it creates a federal interagency task force to study and coordinate policy.

Each year, some 650,000 people leave state and federal prisons, and many times that number leave local jails. Some remain under corrections supervision, while others have served their sentences and have no further supports from the corrections system. Housing problems, including homelessness, are common among this group. These individuals tend to have incomes that are low, and they experience barriers to obtaining housing through the channels that are open to other low-income people. One result is that one in five people who leave prison becomes homeless soon thereafter, if not immediately.

People about to leave jail or prison with no place to live are generally eligible for services from HUD’s homelessness programs. Federal law has placed restrictions on the ability of people returning from prison to utilize Section 8 and Public Housing, and has authorized Public Housing Agencies to impose substantially more restrictions on them. These restrictions are often supported by tenants’ groups.

The current Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP) supports the efforts that come with the threat of homelessness towards people about to leave jail or prison. Ask your state representative if they support this effort.

March 8, 2011

The right to adequate Housing!

No Second Chance: People with Criminal Records Denied Access to Public Housing

Issues surrounding the “one strike” policy.

The exclusion of people with criminal records from public housing.

Transitioning offenders from prison/jail into the community should be offered the basics such as identification documents, housing, linkages to community services and informal networks of support as a response to them approaching an amended lifestyle amongst the civil society of Americans we are. However, they are not so lucky to be given these options.

The right to adequate Housing!

As of current times, housing considerations have met the concerned citizens of this nation straight in the face as effects of the current recession are being felt on all fronts of American markets. Federal “one strike” legislation is one of those points of interest in which during current times legislation is to being questioned of sound judgement and quality when insuring the interest of the greater public is at hand.

In 1996, Bill Clinton’s administration re-charged the “One-Strike” eviction policy.

Designed to rid public housing of drug offenders and criminals, this piece of legislation has been ardently debated due to its comprehensive policy to evict public housing residents who “threaten the health, safety, or peaceful enjoyment of the premises by other tenants or any drug-related criminal activity on or off [italics added] such premises, engaged in by a public housing tenant, any member of the household, or any guest, or other person under the tenant’s control, shall be cause for the termination of tenancy”.

Under this law, an individual can be evicted from their home, not only for their own criminal activity, but also for violations committed by a member of their household. Just a point to consider when expressing the senseless expression of a law in which enforcement has been considered. Are these people not mothers and fathers of innocent children in which current consderations of laws suggest that as long as children are present in a household facing eviction and foreclosure that simpathy be delivered and that hosuehold is allowed optional options beside the current foreclosure or eviction.

If we are going to talk about a stimulus package incentive we most include those that are incarcerated as well.

The campaign slogan for the current President Obama, expressed, simply: Change!

All Americans a re in need of some sort of change at this point in time. As a nation embarking on innovative and advanced pratices of modern (current) day life, criminal convictions are becoming ever so common.

Picture this, in the past five years prison and jail population rate have increased at a much more rapid rate than projected and still increasing. While the response of those being let back out amonst civil America are left unconcerned and unannounced. Leaving question of how are prison/jail inmates fairing upon release?

Is there justice for the prior convicted upon release from detention facilities?
Will these people have to resort back to criminal activites in which punishment was only to send them to their room for some time to think about how to survive as even more of a public threat upon release. I don’t get it.

It seems that credit and taxes are the main focuses which influence this nation when a financial response is needed. To be honest I’d rather spend my money trying to keep joe the crook at bay as best as possible (speaking of some sort of prison transitional housing program) rather than allowing him to become more prone to crime in that of a simple release.

If Change is what we voted for than a change in criminal relations policies in the aspect of allowing those with criminal records obtain some sort of housing when local and state policies are considered and approached.

Thank You

Aaron Shaw

National Coalition for the Homeless advocate
National Low-Income Housing Coalition advocate
Florida Housing Coalition advocate
National Alliance to End Homelessness advocate

March 8, 2011

Recessions cause more cases of homelessness

Recessions mean more homelessness. Increasing numbers of unemployed people are unable to afford rent, and charities and local governments are unable to keep up. Based on estimates of the depth likely to be reached by the current recession, 1.5 million additional Americans are likely to experience homelessness over the next two years, over and above the number who usually become homeless. However, the worst increases in homelessness can be prevented by providing emergency assistance to help stabilize or re-house people experiencing a housing crisis.

This is a statement that has been released via the national Alliance to End Homelessness as an effort to regain a political status as the transition of presidency is the current view point coming from Washington.

As a Florida resident I’m asking that the efforts that were considered by your staff as stood the 110 congressional sitting, the continuation of homelessness is still a rather important topic of discussion and consideration amongst other Floridians.

Honorable Martinez, I’m asking that due to the fact of a current recession I’m not expecting that the concerns of homelessness become the primary assumed function of your staff however that the threats and presumed considerations be taken more as positions in which we are willing to learn and understand from as we carry forth with the primary functions of an American lifestyle.

Thank You

Aaron Shaw