Posts tagged ‘debt’

June 18, 2009

Economic Stimulus Package

Dear Mr. Shaw:

Thank you for contacting me about the economic stimulus package. I appreciate hearing your views.

The American people are hurting. They are losing their homes, their jobs, their businesses and their life savings. Economists across the political spectrum agree that the government needs to take bold and immediate action to stimulate the economy and curb the risk of a protracted economic recession.

I believe that the government has to do something to get us out of this economic tailspin, and doing nothing isn’t an option. I voted for the economic stimulus package because I believe it is narrowly targeted to spend and invest in ways that will get the economy moving again. It invests in our infrastructure, creating badly needed jobs, and provides critical tax relief to businesses and middle-class Americans. It also shores up unemployment benefits and food stamps, provides aid to seniors and disabled veterans, and invests in our children through 21st Century education. The bill improves access to health care, and promotes energy independence.

I’ve read the entire stimulus bill and I believe it will preserve and create millions of good-paying jobs, help States like Florida manage budget shortfalls, and advance our infrastructure to meet modern demands. Congress passed the bill on February 13, and President Obama has now signed it into law.

Unfortunately, there has been a lot of misinformation and inaccurate reporting on this legislation. The stimulus bill does nothing to “socialize” medicine. In fact, it does three things that really help people. First, it lowers the cost of insurance for people who lose their jobs. Second, it gives more money to States to cover medical care for low-income Americans and the uninsured through the Medicaid program. And third, it provides federal funding for the development and use of electronic health records to help doctors and hospitals be more efficient.

Based on what I hear from folks across Florida, it’s clear that we need to fix the problems caused by this economic crisis. But we must take care with taxpayer money. Last year I voted against spending $700 billion to bail out Wall Street because the bill lacked meaningful relief for homeowners facing foreclosure and didn’t include adequate protections for American taxpayers. I remain committed to reducing wasteful spending and improving transparency in Federal funding. And once we have returned to prosperity, I remain equally committed to tackling our burgeoning Federal deficit.

I appreciate your comments as they help me serve you better in the Senate, and I look forward to hearing from you should you have any future concerns.

June 16, 2009

No Second Chance: People with Criminal Records Denied Access to Public Housing

Issues surrounding the “one strike” policy.

The exclusion of people with criminal records from public housing.

Transitioning offenders from prison/jail into the community should be offered the basics such as identification documents, housing, linkages to community services and informal networks of support as a response to them approaching an ammended lifestyle amongst the civil society of Americans we are. However, they are not so lucky to be given these options.

The right to adequate Housing!

As of current times, housing considerations have met the concerned citizens of this nation straight in the face as effects of the current reccession are being felt on all fronts of American markets. Federal “one strike” legislation is one of those points of interest in which during current times legislation is to being questioned of sound judgement and quality when insuring the interest of the greater public is at hand.

In 1996, Bill Clinton’s administration re-charged the “One-Strike” eviction policy.

Designed to rid public housing of drug offenders and criminals, this piece of legislation has been ardently debated due to its comprehensive policy to evict public housing residents who “threaten the health, safety, or peaceful enjoyment of the premises by other tenants or any drug-related criminal activity on or off [italics added] such premises, engaged in by a public housing tenant, any member of the household, or any guest, or other person under the tenant’s control, shall be cause for the termination of tenancy”.

Under this law, an individual can be evicted from their home, not only for their own criminal activity, but also for violations committed by a member of their household. Just a point to consider when expressing the senseless expression of a law in which enforcement has been considered. Are these people not mothers and fathers of innocent children in which current consderations of laws suggest that as long as children are present in a household facing eviction and foreclosure that simpathy be delivered and that hosuehold is allowed optional options beside the current foreclosure or eviction.

If we are going to talk about a stimulus package incentive we most include those that are incarcerated as well.

The campaign slogan for the current President Obama, expressed, simply: Change!

All Americans a re in need of some sort of change at this point in time. As a nation embarking on innovative and advanced pratices of modern (current) day life, criminal convictions are becoming ever so common.

Picture this, in the past five years prison and jail population rate have increased at a much more rapid rate than projected and still increasing. While the response of those being let back out amonst civil America are left unconcerned and unannounced. Leaving question of how are prison/jail inmates fairing upon release?

Is there justice for the prior convicted upon release from detention facilities?
Will these people have to resort back to criminal activites in which punishment was only to send them to their room for some time to think about how to survive as even more of a public threat upon release. I don’t get it.

It seems that credit and taxes are the main focuses which influence this nation when a financial response is needed. To be honest I’d rather spend my money trying to keep joe the crook at bay as best as possible (speaking of some sort of prison transitional housing program) rather than allowing him to become more prone to crime in that of a simple release.

If Change is what we voted for than a change in criminal relations policies in the aspect of allowing those with criminal records obtain some sort of housing when local and state policies are considered and approached.