Posts tagged ‘Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program (HPRP)’

March 10, 2011

Samaritan Housing program

The $50 million Samaritan Housing program is a new program effort not requested in previous years. HUD’s Samaritan program will be used in conjunction with other Federal resources, particularly those from HHS and VA, aimed at ending chronic homelessness. Currently, there exist resources spread among many Departments and agencies, which, in general, assist homeless people, including those who experience chronic homelessness. However, the Samaritan Housing program will provide targeted resources to assist this visible population of homeless people. These resources will be focused strategically to secure the desired performance outcomes. (Comments from the website of Housing and Urban Development Agency; HUD)

Authorizing legislation will be submitted to amend the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 1987, as amended.

As information has been received as to the presentation of this program as an incentive towards ending chronic homelessness some questions have arrived as to how to make this an acting program to become benefactors as citizens of the state of Florida? The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act has been re-introduced to the 110th congressional proceedings to becoming an active bill as well as seeking sponsors that may allow this nation to become a witness of a working legislation proceeding as well as benefactors of a program that will promote a positive working and socially functioning environment for all people of this nation.

The Samaritan Housing program builds on the joint Departments of Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services (HHS), and Veteran Affairs (VA) effort, announced in July 2002, and developed under the aegis of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness. The Council is comprised of 18 Federal departments and agencies. A jointly issued NOFA will seek to identify model programs throughout the country that have been successful in reducing the number of homeless people living on the street.

Seeing as to how this program is based solely on a federal level, it may pose a threat to the local organizations that have already committed to making homelessness an issue that is only heard about from other cities. So how is this to be introduced as a working means of funds to also promote the positive influence of making the streets free of homelessness? The program’s scope will be to communities throughout the country who are prepared to partner with the Federal government to produce visible, measurable, and quantifiable performance outcomes that reduce the number of people living on the streets and in encampments.

As the scope of the program is considered then the possibility of conducting a means of communication as a response to this possible funding action seems to be the only way to announce and implicate the public efforts of a community and the local agencies handling the issue of homelessness to become aware of.

The fiscal year 2005 Budget proposes $50 million for the Samaritan Housing program to focus on those experiencing chronic homelessness on the streets across the country. The program’s resources will provide housing options and appropriate aggressive outreach and services to homeless people residing outside the reach of current programs. This initiative supports the Strategic Objective to end chronic homelessness. The effort is also crucial to reducing overall homelessness because persons who are chronically homeless often require resources beyond their proportion of the overall homeless population. Effective programs to meet the needs of this difficult population will free up resources for the overall homeless reduction effort. This initiative will provide effective models that can be used more broadly.

This specific effort requires additional resources to support the strategic means to fulfill the President’s and Secretary’s commitment to end chronic homelessness by 2012. The requested budget amount will represent HUD’s segment of a larger total amount of resources in a broader Samaritan Initiative to end chronic homelessness in a decade reflecting the continuation of the jointly administered effort begun in 2002. The Samaritan Housing program will focus on targeting those people experiencing chronic homelessness with an outcome oriented, field tested outreach strategy that will appropriately move this street population into supportive housing settings that combine housing and social services to support and sustain the resultant tenancies.

This initiative’s scope will be to communities throughout the country who are prepared to partner with the Federal government to produce visible, measurable, and quantifiable performance outcomes that reduce the number of people living on the streets.

The Samaritan Housing program continues and builds on the joint HUD, HHS and VA effort, announced in July 2002, and developed under the aegis of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (comprised of 20 Federal departments and agencies). A joint Notice of Fund Availability (NOFA) was issued in January 2003. It focused on initiating the President’s and Secretary’s commitment to end chronic homelessness, and to identify model programs throughout the country that will successfully reduce the number of homeless people living on the streets. Awards were made to 11 grantees. The United States Interagency Council on Homelessness will continue to provide leadership for jointly administered efforts to assist the chronically homeless population, including specifically, the Samaritan Housing program as part of the broader Samaritan Initiative to end chronic homelessness.

As a question coming from the reading of this program(Samaritan Housing program), how is one considered as a benefactor of this program if one is a chronic homeless person? The Samaritan Housing Initiative will be fully implemented and the number of chronically homeless who are assisted will be maximized. The Administration will submit legislation for the Samaritan initiative, a new competitive grant program that supports the administration’s efforts to end chronic homelessness by [2002] 2012. Funding of $50 million for housing grants is requested in 2005 to support the most promising local strategies to move chronically homeless persons from the streets to safe permanent housing with supportive services. Supportive Services will be funded through [HHS and VA funded by] the Departments of [Housing and Urban Development (HUD)], Health and Human Services (HHS), and Veterans Affairs (VA).(U.S.Department of Housing and Development)

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July 15, 2009

Reflecting the trend of growing family homelessness

It seems that under the assumption of the Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) provided by the Department on Housing and Urban Development (HUD) there has not been much to add when the concerns of homelessness is presented. Meaning that accorind to the update the number of recorded homeless individuals has not changed much since the last report, in fact, the numbers have not cahnged much since the 2005 report was published.

How?

Why?

Aren’t we as a nation facing one of the most economicaly uncompromisable assumptions of a recession that this nation has witnessed, ever?

Yes, However, the Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) does not count individuals and families temporarily staying with others, or living at their own expense in motels. Individuals and families in these dire circumstances are erroneously viewed as housed, to be considered homeless only when they wind up on the streets or in emergency shelters. The newly passed HEARTH Act requires HUD to begin defining many of these individuals and families as homeless.

Bringing us to the assumption of the HOMELESSNESS PULSE PROJECT.

The Homelessness Pulse project is intended to help the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) gain a better understanding of the impact of the current economic crisis on homelessness. This understanding relies heavily on collecting up-to-date information on how counts of homeless persons may be changing as the crisis unfolds.