Posts tagged ‘HUD’

March 9, 2011

Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program

The Second Chance Act, passed by Congress and signed by the President in early 2008, has been explicitly billed as a “first step” in developing a more effective federal response to the problem of people leaving corrections without adequate support. This act reauthorizes and revises an existing grant program within the Department of Justice, providing money to states for reentry programs, and it creates a federal interagency task force to study and coordinate policy.

Each year, some 650,000 people leave state and federal prisons, and many times that number leave local jails. Some remain under corrections supervision, while others have served their sentences and have no further supports from the corrections system. Housing problems, including homelessness, are common among this group. These individuals tend to have incomes that are low, and they experience barriers to obtaining housing through the channels that are open to other low-income people. One result is that one in five people who leave prison becomes homeless soon thereafter, if not immediately.

People about to leave jail or prison with no place to live are generally eligible for services from HUD’s homelessness programs. Federal law has placed restrictions on the ability of people returning from prison to utilize Section 8 and Public Housing, and has authorized Public Housing Agencies to impose substantially more restrictions on them. These restrictions are often supported by tenants’ groups.

The current Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP) supports the efforts that come with the threat of homelessness towards people about to leave jail or prison. Ask your state representative if they support this effort.

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February 15, 2011

Budgeting Cuts to affect Homeless Programs

Amidst the current considerations to save money and cut a slice out of the national deficit the President is proposing a five year plan to make drastic cuts towards programs in an effort to save money. Any and all federal programs are at risk of drastic cuts being made that will spark not only critical changes to how programs are treated but also the way that these programs are to further offer assistance.

For example, funding for the Homeless has issued a letter of concern as the consideration also targets what type of services are to be offered as of now.

What is currently at risk is # $2.2 billion for HUD’s McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Grants programs, 10,000 new HUD – Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) vouchers and 10,000 vouchers through the Housing and Services for Homeless Persons Demonstration.

As of now we must take the initiative to bring an awareness to the current budgeting dilemma and ask that no changes are made to how we handle the problems associated with tending to the Homeless.
This has become a major issue as more and morea families across the nation are witnessing hard times and the lack or enough income to maintain and stay afloat.

Something has to be done and what can be done is not to take away from programs that assist those in need.

June 17, 2009

Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP

In September of 2008, members of the House along with several members of the Housing and Urban Development committee began talks to discuss changes in how homelessness is characterized and defined in the eyes of America. Since then, efforts have come to pass in the regards of preventive responses considering how homelessness is characterized by the Housing and Urban Development committee.

Under federal guidelines when considering someone that expresses the defined characterization of homelessness: “A homeless individual shall be eligible for assistance under any program provided by this chapter, only if the individual complies with the income eligibility requirements otherwise applicable to such program.”(Title 42, Chapter 119, Subchapter I; 11302. General definition of homeless individual)

The United States has the largest number of homeless women and children that has been reported since the Great Depression, have so many families been without homes. Homelessness became a significant social problem in the 1980s. The number of people experiencing homelessness has risen steadily to the present levels of three to four million annually.

As the start of 2009 and a new presidency begins the approach considered by this nation is that homelessness can be ended before it becomes a permanent feature of the national landscape. From that thought congress in its 111th session has introduced The Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP),” under Title XII of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The Rapid Re-Housing is an innovative program that facilitates rapid re-housing by relying on early identification and resolution of a family’s or individual’s “housing barriers” and providing the assistance necessary to facilitate their return to permanent housing.

As Homeless Prevention is expressed, rapidly re-housing those that have been threaten by job loss and foreclosure by boosting the economic approach upon a federal response is the best option as of yet. Housing has become affordable to the point that this is the best case scenario to place an impactful consideration towards the employment and housing industries while they are pliable regarding a public view.