Posts tagged ‘money’

June 24, 2009

Unemployment Risks!

14 states have run out of moeny alltoed towards unemployment claims.

http://uspoverty.change.org/blog/view/hows_your_states_unemployment_insurance_doing

June 21, 2009

Sadowski Housing Trust Fund

Florida continues to face its greatest housing crisis ever, despite having prepared for such a crisis in 1992 with the establishment of the Sadowski Housing Trust Fund.

Yet, in 06/07, when the Sadowski Housing Trust Fund doc stamp tax generated more nearly $940 million dollars, only $545 million was allocated for housing and hurricane housing recovery programs in the state. Housing costs have increased by at least 77 percent since 2002 while the median income has risen just 1.4 percent. Homelessness in the state is at record numbers and each family needs significantly greater assistance than they would have needed six years ago. Coupled with our state’s innovative housing programs, we have enough resources to address this housing crisis, but only if the cap is removed and Sadoswki fully funded.

These small grants are provided to 28 local coalitions to fulfill the myriad of responsibilities assigned to them under state law and help equip them to mobilize and coordinate the local response to homelessness.

Attention towards a rural provision is expected to being met as counties in Florida such as Polk are becoming aware of the threats of homelessness.

“Homeless Person” refers to an individual who lacks a fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence.
The term does not refer to any individual imprisoned or otherwise detained pursuant to state or federal law. Why?

June 21, 2009

A letter to Corrections Departments

As this society tries to cope with the consideration that foreclosure is the leading reason that we are facing such an economic hassle, one may consider excepting new practices to keep our banks from continuing to turn up-side.

Are prison system is being over run with people that have committed crimes that are being warranted with extensive time and not giving them the consideration of being redeemed for their behavior. As this economic crisis increases, a proposal to aid those that are upon re-entry into our society of productive and innovative citizens has been considered as america tries to keep its people housed.

This effort need exposure to how the corrections system of our state handles those that might be facing difficulties approaching housing once released. Background checks, a formula to negate the type of crime committed, available supplies and money that the local service providers are allotted are considered when approaching the reasoning behind how this system may be approached as the effort of affordable housing is reached.

The funding consideration is being delivered into this approach, however, the individual approach of how to promote and influence this effort is the issue at hand. We must remember that there are situations in which a prisoner has become employed while serving time and upon release need such an effort in the consideration of aiding those upon re-entry a supportive approval towards adequate housing as a primary function to becoming productive citizens.

Consider your corrections departments and ask how to aid in this effort as our housing economy takes strides towards an improved system of expectable affordable options for all classes of americans rather low-income, those facing foreclosure, or those upon re-entry of this compassionate society of humanitarians.

June 21, 2009

Homeless Children and Youth Act of 2009

Mr. Shaw –

Thanks for your phone call. Congressman Davis is planning to continue his work on changing the definition of “homeless” in the 111th Congress. You may be aware of the “Homeless Children and Youth Amendment” that the Congressman offered at the committee mark-up of HEARTH in the fall. He recently joined Congresswoman Biggert to introduce the amendment as a stand alone bill in the 111th Congress (H.R. 29, the Homeless Children and Youth Act of 2009).

Let me know if you have any additional questions I can answer. Thanks.

Lauren O’Brien

Legislative Director

Office of Congressman Geoff Davis (KY-04)

1108 Longworth House Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

(202) 225-3465

June 21, 2009

Home Buyer Assistance

Dear Mr. Shaw:

Thank you for writing to Governor Charlie Crist expressing your views on Senate Bill 2636 relating to Home Buyer Assistance currently being considered by the Florida Legislature. At present, this bill has not been adopted by the Legislature. The Governor appreciates hearing your views and asked that I respond on his behalf.

The Executive Office of the Governor follows all bills as they move through the legislative process. Generally, Governor Crist does not take a position on a specific bill until it has been adopted by the Legislature and presented for his action, as bills can be amended substantially during the legislative process. Please be assured, when final legislation is presented to the Governor, the concerns and views of Floridians like yourself weigh in his decisions.

Again, thank you for taking the time to write to Governor Crist. Your thoughts are very important to him. You may also wish to share your comments with your local legislators as they develop and make decisions on related legislative proposals.

Sincerely,

Aundra Bryant

Office of Policy and Budget

Executive Office of the Governor

June 18, 2009

Economic Stimulus Package

Dear Mr. Shaw:

Thank you for contacting me about the economic stimulus package. I appreciate hearing your views.

The American people are hurting. They are losing their homes, their jobs, their businesses and their life savings. Economists across the political spectrum agree that the government needs to take bold and immediate action to stimulate the economy and curb the risk of a protracted economic recession.

I believe that the government has to do something to get us out of this economic tailspin, and doing nothing isn’t an option. I voted for the economic stimulus package because I believe it is narrowly targeted to spend and invest in ways that will get the economy moving again. It invests in our infrastructure, creating badly needed jobs, and provides critical tax relief to businesses and middle-class Americans. It also shores up unemployment benefits and food stamps, provides aid to seniors and disabled veterans, and invests in our children through 21st Century education. The bill improves access to health care, and promotes energy independence.

I’ve read the entire stimulus bill and I believe it will preserve and create millions of good-paying jobs, help States like Florida manage budget shortfalls, and advance our infrastructure to meet modern demands. Congress passed the bill on February 13, and President Obama has now signed it into law.

Unfortunately, there has been a lot of misinformation and inaccurate reporting on this legislation. The stimulus bill does nothing to “socialize” medicine. In fact, it does three things that really help people. First, it lowers the cost of insurance for people who lose their jobs. Second, it gives more money to States to cover medical care for low-income Americans and the uninsured through the Medicaid program. And third, it provides federal funding for the development and use of electronic health records to help doctors and hospitals be more efficient.

Based on what I hear from folks across Florida, it’s clear that we need to fix the problems caused by this economic crisis. But we must take care with taxpayer money. Last year I voted against spending $700 billion to bail out Wall Street because the bill lacked meaningful relief for homeowners facing foreclosure and didn’t include adequate protections for American taxpayers. I remain committed to reducing wasteful spending and improving transparency in Federal funding. And once we have returned to prosperity, I remain equally committed to tackling our burgeoning Federal deficit.

I appreciate your comments as they help me serve you better in the Senate, and I look forward to hearing from you should you have any future concerns.

June 17, 2009

Minimum wage the new living wage!

Despite the current struggle in regards to our nations economic crisis, let it be known that it seems to negate the problem with homes being foreclosed one may take a look at our current living wage standard.

An assumption taken against the cost of living that is expected out of a general area, it is safe to say that as a Floridian I’m assumed to make roughly $16.68 an hour to reside in the state at a comfortable level. Meaning that all my bills are being paid on time and that I have not neglected and of my expected obligations. One can find descriptions of both minimum wages and living wages as the amount a full-time worker should be paid to earn a decent living, to meet basic family needs, to avoid poverty, and so on. The minimum wage is often described as a “starting wage” or a “wage floor” or “a wage to protect the most vulnerable workers,” in contrast to the living wage as a wage that can sustain a family.

As job loss is continuing to present itself as a hassle, the expected criteria that goes along with the interpretation of a fair and consistent wage agreement will soon be tested. With the introduction of a new president we as a nation also received an incentive as the minimum wage went up as well in the beginning of the year; however, with our nation lacking resources what will the new projection of a wage agreement be by the time this crisis is resolved?

June 17, 2009

Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP

In September of 2008, members of the House along with several members of the Housing and Urban Development committee began talks to discuss changes in how homelessness is characterized and defined in the eyes of America. Since then, efforts have come to pass in the regards of preventive responses considering how homelessness is characterized by the Housing and Urban Development committee.

Under federal guidelines when considering someone that expresses the defined characterization of homelessness: “A homeless individual shall be eligible for assistance under any program provided by this chapter, only if the individual complies with the income eligibility requirements otherwise applicable to such program.”(Title 42, Chapter 119, Subchapter I; 11302. General definition of homeless individual)

The United States has the largest number of homeless women and children that has been reported since the Great Depression, have so many families been without homes. Homelessness became a significant social problem in the 1980s. The number of people experiencing homelessness has risen steadily to the present levels of three to four million annually.

As the start of 2009 and a new presidency begins the approach considered by this nation is that homelessness can be ended before it becomes a permanent feature of the national landscape. From that thought congress in its 111th session has introduced The Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP),” under Title XII of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The Rapid Re-Housing is an innovative program that facilitates rapid re-housing by relying on early identification and resolution of a family’s or individual’s “housing barriers” and providing the assistance necessary to facilitate their return to permanent housing.

As Homeless Prevention is expressed, rapidly re-housing those that have been threaten by job loss and foreclosure by boosting the economic approach upon a federal response is the best option as of yet. Housing has become affordable to the point that this is the best case scenario to place an impactful consideration towards the employment and housing industries while they are pliable regarding a public view.

June 17, 2009

Low Income Housing Tax Credit.

Dear Mr. Shaw:

Thank you for contacting me regarding the Low Income Housing Tax Credit. I share your concerns about the availability of safe and affordable housing in Florida.

The Low Income Housing Tax Credit program provides an incentive for the investment of private equity into affordable housing for low-income Americans. Over the past 22 years, the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program has helped to create more than 2 million affordable apartments for low-income families.

I believe we must act to help those most at-risk in this receding economy. That is why I voted for HR.1, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. This legislation, also known as the economic stimulus package, includes a $2.2 billion investment in the low-income housing tax credit program to be made available to State housing agencies. These funds will offer an additional incentive for the creation of more affordable housing in Florida.

I will keep your views in mind as we continue to find solutions that address the economic difficulties facing Florida and the nation. Please don’t hesitate to contact me again.

Sincerely,
Senator Bill Nelson

June 16, 2009

Credit Cardholders’ Bill of Rights

Having Credit Card issues?

Here is a response that I received from Bill Nelson in regards to the trouble with credit card debt in America as of now.

Dear Mr. Shaw:

Thank you for contacting me about credit card reform and your support for the Credit Cardholders’ Bill of Rights.

As Congress works to get our economy back on track, I believe that we must also reform credit card marketing and billing practices. I am urging my colleagues in the Senate to consider reforms for all aspects of the financial system, including regulation of the credit card industry.

I am aware of the high fees that some credit card companies charge consumers, in addition to the unscrupulous, abusive and predatory practices by some bad actors within the industry. Indeed, we’ve seen a rapid growth in the number of lenders who target consumers with less-than-perfect credit histories and low-income and minority households with high interest loans. These practices in the area of mortgage lending have had devastating effects on consumers and the country.

Rest assured, I will continue to work toward fair credit practices that protect Florida’s families. Please feel free to contact me in the future.