Posts tagged ‘budget’

June 21, 2009

A letter to Corrections Departments

As this society tries to cope with the consideration that foreclosure is the leading reason that we are facing such an economic hassle, one may consider excepting new practices to keep our banks from continuing to turn up-side.

Are prison system is being over run with people that have committed crimes that are being warranted with extensive time and not giving them the consideration of being redeemed for their behavior. As this economic crisis increases, a proposal to aid those that are upon re-entry into our society of productive and innovative citizens has been considered as america tries to keep its people housed.

This effort need exposure to how the corrections system of our state handles those that might be facing difficulties approaching housing once released. Background checks, a formula to negate the type of crime committed, available supplies and money that the local service providers are allotted are considered when approaching the reasoning behind how this system may be approached as the effort of affordable housing is reached.

The funding consideration is being delivered into this approach, however, the individual approach of how to promote and influence this effort is the issue at hand. We must remember that there are situations in which a prisoner has become employed while serving time and upon release need such an effort in the consideration of aiding those upon re-entry a supportive approval towards adequate housing as a primary function to becoming productive citizens.

Consider your corrections departments and ask how to aid in this effort as our housing economy takes strides towards an improved system of expectable affordable options for all classes of americans rather low-income, those facing foreclosure, or those upon re-entry of this compassionate society of humanitarians.

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June 21, 2009

Homeless Children and Youth Act of 2009

Mr. Shaw –

Thanks for your phone call. Congressman Davis is planning to continue his work on changing the definition of “homeless” in the 111th Congress. You may be aware of the “Homeless Children and Youth Amendment” that the Congressman offered at the committee mark-up of HEARTH in the fall. He recently joined Congresswoman Biggert to introduce the amendment as a stand alone bill in the 111th Congress (H.R. 29, the Homeless Children and Youth Act of 2009).

Let me know if you have any additional questions I can answer. Thanks.

Lauren O’Brien

Legislative Director

Office of Congressman Geoff Davis (KY-04)

1108 Longworth House Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

(202) 225-3465

June 21, 2009

Home Buyer Assistance

Dear Mr. Shaw:

Thank you for writing to Governor Charlie Crist expressing your views on Senate Bill 2636 relating to Home Buyer Assistance currently being considered by the Florida Legislature. At present, this bill has not been adopted by the Legislature. The Governor appreciates hearing your views and asked that I respond on his behalf.

The Executive Office of the Governor follows all bills as they move through the legislative process. Generally, Governor Crist does not take a position on a specific bill until it has been adopted by the Legislature and presented for his action, as bills can be amended substantially during the legislative process. Please be assured, when final legislation is presented to the Governor, the concerns and views of Floridians like yourself weigh in his decisions.

Again, thank you for taking the time to write to Governor Crist. Your thoughts are very important to him. You may also wish to share your comments with your local legislators as they develop and make decisions on related legislative proposals.

Sincerely,

Aundra Bryant

Office of Policy and Budget

Executive Office of the Governor

June 18, 2009

Economic Stimulus Package

Dear Mr. Shaw:

Thank you for contacting me about the economic stimulus package. I appreciate hearing your views.

The American people are hurting. They are losing their homes, their jobs, their businesses and their life savings. Economists across the political spectrum agree that the government needs to take bold and immediate action to stimulate the economy and curb the risk of a protracted economic recession.

I believe that the government has to do something to get us out of this economic tailspin, and doing nothing isn’t an option. I voted for the economic stimulus package because I believe it is narrowly targeted to spend and invest in ways that will get the economy moving again. It invests in our infrastructure, creating badly needed jobs, and provides critical tax relief to businesses and middle-class Americans. It also shores up unemployment benefits and food stamps, provides aid to seniors and disabled veterans, and invests in our children through 21st Century education. The bill improves access to health care, and promotes energy independence.

I’ve read the entire stimulus bill and I believe it will preserve and create millions of good-paying jobs, help States like Florida manage budget shortfalls, and advance our infrastructure to meet modern demands. Congress passed the bill on February 13, and President Obama has now signed it into law.

Unfortunately, there has been a lot of misinformation and inaccurate reporting on this legislation. The stimulus bill does nothing to “socialize” medicine. In fact, it does three things that really help people. First, it lowers the cost of insurance for people who lose their jobs. Second, it gives more money to States to cover medical care for low-income Americans and the uninsured through the Medicaid program. And third, it provides federal funding for the development and use of electronic health records to help doctors and hospitals be more efficient.

Based on what I hear from folks across Florida, it’s clear that we need to fix the problems caused by this economic crisis. But we must take care with taxpayer money. Last year I voted against spending $700 billion to bail out Wall Street because the bill lacked meaningful relief for homeowners facing foreclosure and didn’t include adequate protections for American taxpayers. I remain committed to reducing wasteful spending and improving transparency in Federal funding. And once we have returned to prosperity, I remain equally committed to tackling our burgeoning Federal deficit.

I appreciate your comments as they help me serve you better in the Senate, and I look forward to hearing from you should you have any future concerns.